Posts Tagged ‘Creative Carbon Scotland’

Culture Conversation – Culture and Climate Change

November 28, 2017

The Scottish Government is currently involved in ‘early engagement’ on a new Cultural Strategy for Scotland.

In early November, Creative Carbon Scotland hosted a discussion as part of the Scottish Government’s consultation on the development of a new Culture Strategy for Scotland.

Joined by arts and sustainability practitioners working across a range of contexts, we focused on the connections between culture and climate change and the role of the arts in wider society, particularly in relation to environmental sustainability.

We convened the meeting around three key questions, relating the Scottish Government’s Culture Conversations questions to the issue of climate change. We also provided an online survey for those who were unable to participate in the event, some of the points from which are also included here.

The discussion focused on three questions:

  • What do you perceive as the role of arts and culture in contributing to a more sustainable Scotland at individual, organisational and strategic levels?
  • What are key examples of good practice and opportunities for new collaborations across cultural and sustainable sectors?
  • What are the priority areas to further the role of culture in bringing about transformational change to a more sustainable Scotland?

To read the key points from the meeting visit the Creative Carbon Scotland website.

culture/SHIFT ¦ two cities, two challenges

March 17, 2017

Creative Carbon Scotland’s culture/SHIFT programme has two events specifically focused on key issues for cities – Aberdeen and Glasgow:

  1. What can be done in post-industrial North Glasgow?
  2. How to speed up post-fossil fuel Aberdeen (i.e. move postively to the post-industrial)?

Aberdeen Green Tease: Cultural Practices in a Post-Fossil Fuel Aberdeen

with Nuno Sacramento (Director, Peacock Visual Arts) & Dr Leslie Mabon (Sociologist, Robert Gordon University)

Date Monday 20th March, 18:00 – 20:00

Venue: The Lemon Tree, 5 West North Street, Aberdeen, AB24 5AT

How can cultural practices address a post-fossil fuel future? Join Nuno Sacramento and Dr Leslie Mabon during Aberdeen Climate Week for a special conversation addressing the intersections between culture and sustainability in Aberdeen. Nuno and Leslie will discuss with the Green Tease network key questions about Aberdeen’s future social, economic and environmental sustainability, and the role of art and art institutions in creating an independent framework for addressing these concerns. Read more and register here.

 

Glasgow Green Tease: Whatever the Weather: Being Climate Ready in North Glasgow

Date: Wednesday 29th March, 18:30 – 20:30

Venue: The Grove Community Centre, 182 Saracen St, Glasgow, G22 5EP

What are the challenges and opportunities associated with climate change in North Glasgow? How can cultural practitioners contribute to climate change engagement strategies within the city’s communities and more widely? During this Green Tease we’ll be joined by the Glasgow Centre for Population Health and multi-disciplinary collective ice cream architecture to learn about the ‘Whatever the Weather’ engagement project in North Glasgow, exploring how communities can become more prepared and stronger in the face of climate change. We’re keen to use this opportunity to share experiences and learn from others working in similar engagement and intervention initiatives throughout the city. Read more and register here.

We need a Percent for Art for Energy

June 18, 2016

Elizabeth Monoian and Robert Ferry, Directors of the Land Art Generator Initiative, reflect on another aspect to emerge from the ‘Beautiful Renewables’ workshop hosted by Creative Carbon Scotland.

Cities that recognize the value of arts and culture have long benefited from percent for art programs. It has become expected (and in many cases required) for large-scale development projects to invest at least 1% in the arts, especially when there is public funding involved, either by bringing an artist onto the project team to produce a local outcome, or by investing in a fund that is pooled for larger projects throughout the city.

As we increase our focus on large-scale environmental and climate design solutions—resilient infrastructures, environmental remediation, regenerative water and energy projects—it is high time that a similar percent for art requirement be placed on these projects as well. This simple policy standard would bring great benefit to communities that otherwise find themselves left out of the process. Even when their net benefit to the environment is clear, if these projects have not been considered from a cultural perspective, they risk being ignored at best. And at worst they risk alienating the public and sparking push-back against similar future projects.

Involving artists in the process can instead deliver a more holistic approach to sustainability that addresses social equity, environmental justice, aesthetics, local needs, and other important cultural considerations. As we have said from the founding of LAGI in 2008, “sustainability is not only about resources, but it is also about social harmony.”

More…

When tomorrow becomes yesterday

April 12, 2016

Creative Carbon Scotland, addressing all the arts, asked us to highlight this:

How do we understand the effects that climate change will have on future societies? Can musical practices bring us closer to this understanding by creating different forms of expression and experience?

In this one-day workshop Creative Carbon Scotland and musician Jo Mango are inviting up to ten music practitioners to get together and consider how the work they make could interpret the complex subject matter of climate change in new ways. Joined by Dr Simon Shackley (School of Geosciences at the University of Edinburgh) we’ll use this opportunity to learn about current practices and theories concerning the transition to a low carbon society, and reflect upon the ways in which songwriting and musical composition might contribute to a re-imagining of social and environmental futures. The workshop is free to attend with lunch and refreshments provided.

Source: When tomorrow becomes yesterday: Musical responses to climate change workshop – Creative Carbon Scotland

Land Art Generator Initiative: Glasgow

December 1, 2015

Excerpts from a recent Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI) blog,

We believe that there is no better tool for creating a tipping point to strong climate action and 100% renewable energy infrastructure than to present a positive vision to the public of what that could look like and the residual benefits that such policies would bring to cities. The opportunity to bring new energy technologies into city planning and creative placemaking projects is at the heart of LAGI. As a part of the design and implementation of constructed works, LAGI educational programming provides the perfect platform for extensive community engagement and participatory design processes, leading to infrastructures that benefit the greatest number of people. LAGI Glasgow is proving to be the perfect example of this ideal delivery model.

In early 2013, we received an email from Chris Fremantle, producer, researcher, and founder of ecoartscotland. Following on conversations he had as a part of Creative Carbon Scotland’s Green Teas(e) — part of the European Green Arts Lab Alliance project, Chris wanted to know what it would take to bring LAGI to Scotland in 2015. From the start he was interested in customizing the planning of LAGI Glasgow to reflect the complexities of the debate around renewables and their relationship to key environments in Scotland. The success of renewable energy implementation there since the early 2000′s has figured heavily into land use and conservation discussions and has been extremely relevant to the independence debate.

Continue reading here

Elizabeth Monoian and Robert Ferry, LAGI Directors, spoke at the first ArtCOP Scotland event in Edinburgh, hosted by Creative Carbon Scotland.  Read Creative Carbon Scotland’s blog here.

Spirited discussions pt. 4 (by Ben Twist, Director of Creative Carbon Scotland)

September 12, 2013
Dave Young, Carbon Catcher, and Sam Clark, artist and contributor to Spirited discussion 4, in the Meadows.  Photo CO2 Edenburgh.

Dave Young, Carbon Catcher, and Sam Clark, artist and contributor to Spirited discussion 4, in the Meadows. Photo CO2 Edenburgh.

The last of our Spirited Discussions asking, ‘Can Art Change the Climate? was entitled:

Going Beyond the Material: Environment and Invisible Forces in the Literary, Performing and Visual Arts.

This, in some ways, reminded me of Wallace Heim’s reference in Spirited Discussion part 2 to Alan Badiou’s idea that the four critical kinds of event which change people are love, science, art and politics.

In the performing arts particularly there is arguably no ‘thing’ that is the work of art: there is the event that is found in the ether between the player and the audience; there is the growth of digital publishing which has emphasised that the same is true of the written work.  With the written word the format is sometimes less important than the content and the work of art is an event taking place in the reader’s head, brought about by the words in whatever form they are reproduced (consider audiobooks). This aesthetic view could of course be equally true of visual artworks; the event takes place when we view the work, but in an empty gallery or an unoccupied installation all that exists is some colour on a surface or a collection of items.

Lucy Miu, Business Manager of the Bedlam Theatre and driving force behind this year and next’s Dramatic Impacts, is also an Environmental Sciences student, effectively straddling the line between the arts and the sciences. She argued that for people to be informed by information they need to be engaged with it. This is backed up by plenty of behaviour change research which shows that plain information has almost no effect on the recipient’s behaviour.  Kate Foster concurred: her experience with biology students saw them overwhelmed by the sheer level of information they were being asked to take in. Her artistic practice allowed them to make sense of it, focus their new knowledge and understand it, rather than just know it. Lucy felt that the arts, which engage us emotionally, can help, and that perhaps they also help where the original experience is not available to all, (murdering the King of Scotland, experiencing the bombing of Guernica), and the artist can bring that experience to a wider audience.

For me, what is particularly important here is that an artist may, perhaps must if they are to be described as an artist rather than a mere reporter, have special insight into the experience that they transmit to the audience along with the basic information: information + insight is what gets the event lodged in the audience’s understanding. Information + insight creates the sort of event we are interested in.

Lucy also made the point that all performing arts events are group activities.  At the very least there is an audience as well as a performer, whilst engaging with visual arts is, or can be, a more solitary business. In her view this made the performing arts more engaging but Tim Collins argued that different forms do different things. (The similarities and differences between the visual and performing arts were questions that arose regularly and usefully during CO2 Edenburgh: Spirit in the Air.) The question of whether feeling is enough arose again, just as it had been raised by Chris Speed in Discussion 1, and it clearly isn’t enough: pornography, a well-made horror film or Love Story make us feel, but that doesn’t seem to be enough to change people or their behaviour as Badiou seems to be getting at.

Here Sam Clark made her first intervention noting that, to the writer Rebecca Solnit, the difference for the writer between discarding an article and having it published is minimal, but history starts when events happen. The event may happen almost accidentally, or is at least subject to chance, and is not solely in the artist’s gift. How does this square with Wallace Heim’s view that the artists’ practices create the conditions where [Badiou’s] change can happen (remember love, science, art and politics)? The answer is surely that art is a fairly slippery thing with fuzzy boundaries. Questions of intention, insight, engagement and emotion swirl around this subject, which is perhaps what makes the question of whether art can change the climate so difficult to disentangle, let alone answer.

Sam Clark chose to address the title Going Beyond the Material more directly in her short and very beautiful talk, speaking about scientists working on matter. Only 4.7% of reality is material, according to a physicist she knows; 75% is dark matter whose existence is only deduced from its interaction with matter and gravity. Even less concrete is dark energy, only imagined because the universe is expanding and accelerating, not shrinking or slowing down. These scientists are working on a relationship between the visible and the invisible, or in artistic terms the knowable and the ineffable (strikingly similar in my mind to Andrew Patrizio’s conjunction of the mercantile and the religious in fifteenth century Florence – see Discussion 3). The scientists at the Large Hadron Collider at Cern use non-detection as a means of detection; 95% of the universe is only knowable through the instrument of the mind. Here we surely get into the realm of philosophy and for me insight comes to the fore again. What we want from artists – why societies from the year dot have supported, encouraged and valued them – is access to the knowledge of the things that are unknowable just through experience, knowledge that requires use of the instrument of the mind. Sam made the same point – insight and experience of things we don’t understand or things we hate, creating a space of wonder, are the things we want from artists. And as Harry Giles made clear in the first of the Spirited Discussions, actually artists and scientists do many of the same things. But maybe Sam’s last suggestion is what artists do but scientists try to avoid: making the familiar strange.

The session came to a close with a short discussion about empathy, a subject that Reiko Goto Collins had touched upon in her introduction. Sympathy is when you simply feel for another; empathy is when you place yourself in their shoes, which takes more than just emotion. Lucy suggested that maybe if art can change the climate, it is because it can help connect the brain and the heart. If we have done that, just a bit, with CO2 Edenburgh: Spirit in the Air, it will have been well worth it.


%d bloggers like this: