Posts Tagged ‘Creative Carbon Scotland’

Creative Sustainability

October 15, 2018

I don’t know how many people listened to the Moral Maze on Radio 4 on Wednesday evening (10th October)? In the week of the IPCC report saying we have 12 years before we go through the 1.5 degrees of global warming threshold, the programme brought together a debate on the moral implications.

The debate was framed in terms of the competing moral goods between future generations and developing countries, both of whom will disproportionately suffer the impacts of climate breakdown.

The first three witnesses broadly focused on economics and in particular the question ‘Is growth the problem or the solution?’ Can we grow and innovate our way out of the problem (Leo Barasi)? Or do we need to fly less, eat less meat and generally change our lifestyles to be more sustainable and less consuming (George Monbiot)? One of the issues underlying the discussion is the role of ‘progress’. Progress has generated global warming but it has also resulted in longer life spans, lower infant mortality, and more developed countries pay more attention to the environment.

The final speaker was Charlotte Du Caan from the Dark Mountain project to open up the cultural dimension. The panelists mostly agreed with the Dark Mountain manifesto, except the end of this sentence,

We do not believe that everything will be fine. We are not even sure, based on current definitions of progress and improvement, that we want it to be.

The panelist interpreted the Dark Mountain project as having a death wish, to be nihilist, rather than to be opening up a fundamental question of culture. Somehow the fundamental point got lost: ‘Do we want to continue with a culture that promotes individualism that results in endemic mental health problems?’ or ‘Do we want to live in a culture that promotes unlimited consumption of for example fashion, making fashion one of the most polluting and destructive industries?’ or ‘Do we want a culture that disconnects us from the rest of the living world?’

Actually the economic/progress argument is the wrong argument and the cultural argument was not fully grasped in the debate (although at least the cultural dimension was recognized as relevant).

So Creative Carbon Scotland has just launched its Library of Creative Sustainability. Creative Carbon Scotland is one of the organisations who are saying culture has a central role in addressing the environmental crisis in all its dimensions – climate breakdown, pollution, extinction…

The projects highlighted in the Library are all artists working with organisations long term on specific issues in specific contexts. To pick just one example, SLOW Clean UP involves artist Frances Whitehead, Chicago City Council and various University Science Departments working together on cleaning up petroleum pollution in the middle of communities in Chicago by creating gardens. Using plants which have specific capacities (hyperaccumulators) to suck up the pollution, the project cleaned up the test site, identified a significant number of new plants, as well as involving communities in their own environmental health. In the US whilst this approach is known and understood, unless the land has significant economic value, no-one bothers.

What is important is that this is not a binary debate on growth and progress, but rather cultural change towards a different set of values.

All the projects in the new Library demonstrate approaching challenges differently, creative innovations, and involving people in their own places produces new values that are more sustainable.

Have a look at the way artists are ’embedding’ themselves in organisations and contexts to work long term.

This project is supported by ecoartscotland and Gray’s School of Art, Robert Gordon University through an Interface Innovation Voucher.

Culture Conversation – Culture and Climate Change

November 28, 2017

The Scottish Government is currently involved in ‘early engagement’ on a new Cultural Strategy for Scotland.

In early November, Creative Carbon Scotland hosted a discussion as part of the Scottish Government’s consultation on the development of a new Culture Strategy for Scotland.

Joined by arts and sustainability practitioners working across a range of contexts, we focused on the connections between culture and climate change and the role of the arts in wider society, particularly in relation to environmental sustainability.

We convened the meeting around three key questions, relating the Scottish Government’s Culture Conversations questions to the issue of climate change. We also provided an online survey for those who were unable to participate in the event, some of the points from which are also included here.

The discussion focused on three questions:

  • What do you perceive as the role of arts and culture in contributing to a more sustainable Scotland at individual, organisational and strategic levels?
  • What are key examples of good practice and opportunities for new collaborations across cultural and sustainable sectors?
  • What are the priority areas to further the role of culture in bringing about transformational change to a more sustainable Scotland?

To read the key points from the meeting visit the Creative Carbon Scotland website.

culture/SHIFT ¦ two cities, two challenges

March 17, 2017

Creative Carbon Scotland’s culture/SHIFT programme has two events specifically focused on key issues for cities – Aberdeen and Glasgow:

  1. What can be done in post-industrial North Glasgow?
  2. How to speed up post-fossil fuel Aberdeen (i.e. move postively to the post-industrial)?

Aberdeen Green Tease: Cultural Practices in a Post-Fossil Fuel Aberdeen

with Nuno Sacramento (Director, Peacock Visual Arts) & Dr Leslie Mabon (Sociologist, Robert Gordon University)

Date Monday 20th March, 18:00 – 20:00

Venue: The Lemon Tree, 5 West North Street, Aberdeen, AB24 5AT

How can cultural practices address a post-fossil fuel future? Join Nuno Sacramento and Dr Leslie Mabon during Aberdeen Climate Week for a special conversation addressing the intersections between culture and sustainability in Aberdeen. Nuno and Leslie will discuss with the Green Tease network key questions about Aberdeen’s future social, economic and environmental sustainability, and the role of art and art institutions in creating an independent framework for addressing these concerns. Read more and register here.

 

Glasgow Green Tease: Whatever the Weather: Being Climate Ready in North Glasgow

Date: Wednesday 29th March, 18:30 – 20:30

Venue: The Grove Community Centre, 182 Saracen St, Glasgow, G22 5EP

What are the challenges and opportunities associated with climate change in North Glasgow? How can cultural practitioners contribute to climate change engagement strategies within the city’s communities and more widely? During this Green Tease we’ll be joined by the Glasgow Centre for Population Health and multi-disciplinary collective ice cream architecture to learn about the ‘Whatever the Weather’ engagement project in North Glasgow, exploring how communities can become more prepared and stronger in the face of climate change. We’re keen to use this opportunity to share experiences and learn from others working in similar engagement and intervention initiatives throughout the city. Read more and register here.

We need a Percent for Art for Energy

June 18, 2016

Elizabeth Monoian and Robert Ferry, Directors of the Land Art Generator Initiative, reflect on another aspect to emerge from the ‘Beautiful Renewables’ workshop hosted by Creative Carbon Scotland.

Cities that recognize the value of arts and culture have long benefited from percent for art programs. It has become expected (and in many cases required) for large-scale development projects to invest at least 1% in the arts, especially when there is public funding involved, either by bringing an artist onto the project team to produce a local outcome, or by investing in a fund that is pooled for larger projects throughout the city.

As we increase our focus on large-scale environmental and climate design solutions—resilient infrastructures, environmental remediation, regenerative water and energy projects—it is high time that a similar percent for art requirement be placed on these projects as well. This simple policy standard would bring great benefit to communities that otherwise find themselves left out of the process. Even when their net benefit to the environment is clear, if these projects have not been considered from a cultural perspective, they risk being ignored at best. And at worst they risk alienating the public and sparking push-back against similar future projects.

Involving artists in the process can instead deliver a more holistic approach to sustainability that addresses social equity, environmental justice, aesthetics, local needs, and other important cultural considerations. As we have said from the founding of LAGI in 2008, “sustainability is not only about resources, but it is also about social harmony.”

More…

When tomorrow becomes yesterday

April 12, 2016

Creative Carbon Scotland, addressing all the arts, asked us to highlight this:

How do we understand the effects that climate change will have on future societies? Can musical practices bring us closer to this understanding by creating different forms of expression and experience?

In this one-day workshop Creative Carbon Scotland and musician Jo Mango are inviting up to ten music practitioners to get together and consider how the work they make could interpret the complex subject matter of climate change in new ways. Joined by Dr Simon Shackley (School of Geosciences at the University of Edinburgh) we’ll use this opportunity to learn about current practices and theories concerning the transition to a low carbon society, and reflect upon the ways in which songwriting and musical composition might contribute to a re-imagining of social and environmental futures. The workshop is free to attend with lunch and refreshments provided.

Source: When tomorrow becomes yesterday: Musical responses to climate change workshop – Creative Carbon Scotland

Land Art Generator Initiative: Glasgow

December 1, 2015

Excerpts from a recent Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI) blog,

We believe that there is no better tool for creating a tipping point to strong climate action and 100% renewable energy infrastructure than to present a positive vision to the public of what that could look like and the residual benefits that such policies would bring to cities. The opportunity to bring new energy technologies into city planning and creative placemaking projects is at the heart of LAGI. As a part of the design and implementation of constructed works, LAGI educational programming provides the perfect platform for extensive community engagement and participatory design processes, leading to infrastructures that benefit the greatest number of people. LAGI Glasgow is proving to be the perfect example of this ideal delivery model.

In early 2013, we received an email from Chris Fremantle, producer, researcher, and founder of ecoartscotland. Following on conversations he had as a part of Creative Carbon Scotland’s Green Teas(e) — part of the European Green Arts Lab Alliance project, Chris wanted to know what it would take to bring LAGI to Scotland in 2015. From the start he was interested in customizing the planning of LAGI Glasgow to reflect the complexities of the debate around renewables and their relationship to key environments in Scotland. The success of renewable energy implementation there since the early 2000′s has figured heavily into land use and conservation discussions and has been extremely relevant to the independence debate.

Continue reading here

Elizabeth Monoian and Robert Ferry, LAGI Directors, spoke at the first ArtCOP Scotland event in Edinburgh, hosted by Creative Carbon Scotland.  Read Creative Carbon Scotland’s blog here.


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