Posts Tagged ‘Anthropogenic Climate Disruption’

When tomorrow becomes yesterday

April 12, 2016

Creative Carbon Scotland, addressing all the arts, asked us to highlight this:

How do we understand the effects that climate change will have on future societies? Can musical practices bring us closer to this understanding by creating different forms of expression and experience?

In this one-day workshop Creative Carbon Scotland and musician Jo Mango are inviting up to ten music practitioners to get together and consider how the work they make could interpret the complex subject matter of climate change in new ways. Joined by Dr Simon Shackley (School of Geosciences at the University of Edinburgh) we’ll use this opportunity to learn about current practices and theories concerning the transition to a low carbon society, and reflect upon the ways in which songwriting and musical composition might contribute to a re-imagining of social and environmental futures. The workshop is free to attend with lunch and refreshments provided.

Source: When tomorrow becomes yesterday: Musical responses to climate change workshop – Creative Carbon Scotland

“Methane Is” by Ruth Hardinger

March 4, 2016

image
This is a guest piece by artist Ruth Hardinger on artist Aviva Rahmani’s Pushing Rocks blog.
“The global warming potential of CH4 has been upgraded by IPCC to at least 86 times stronger than CO2 during a 20 year time frame of this gas, and 105 times stronger over a 10 year time frame.  Methane, grouped with other near-term climate forcers such as black carbon, hydrofluorocarbon and aerosols, is the most likely greenhouse gas escalating the planetary heat now, because there is so much of it being released.  There have been few measurements of gas leakage from gas wells and pipelines.”
If you are wondering why artists are engaging with science and engineering at this level, and where the art is,
“In recent art installation exhibitions, Hardinger has used abstraction from the methane measurement work for The Basement Rocks and The Basement Rocks – LOUDER.  The materials and sensitivity of constructions encourage awareness of the underground.  These exhibitions are accompanied with “Grounding” a sound of the underground, by rock musician Andy Chase, and letters for the visitors to take that convey her conversations with scientist, Bryce Payne, PhD and professor Ron Bishop, PhD regarding damage that is happening to the underground, the place of the most biomass in our planet.”
The image is a rendering of fugitive emissions spatialised data overlayed on the landscape. Read full article here,
http://pushingrocks.blogspot.co.uk/2016/02/methane-is-shale-gas-methane-emissions.html?m=1

Mourning the planet: Climate scientists share their grieving process – from Truthout

February 1, 2015

Dahr Jamail, staff reporter for Truthout and known for his work on Iraq and Afganistan, speaks to scientists working on Anthropogenic Climate Disruption about their emotional responses in this important piece.  Thanks to Truthout for permission to repost extracts.  Jamail starts,

I have been researching and writing about anthropogenic climate disruption (ACD) for Truthout for the past year, because I have long been deeply troubled by how fast the planet has been emitting its obvious distress signals.

On a nearly daily basis, I’ve sought out the most recent scientific studies, interviewed the top researchers and scientists penning those studies, and connected the dots to give readers as clear a picture as possible about the magnitude of the emergency we are in.

This work has emotional consequences: I’ve struggled with depression, anger and fear. I’ve watched myself shift through some of the five stages of grief proposed by Elisabeth Kübler-Ross: denial, anger, bargaining, depression, acceptance. I’ve grieved for the planet and all the species who live here, and continue to do so as I work today.

Continue reading here…


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