Posts Tagged ‘Newton Harrison’

Reblog: Global Environment Policy as political theatre #COP26

March 17, 2020

Reposting from Artists & Climate Change, Kyoto Forever? UN Climate Conferences as Political Theatre is a valuable exploration of the ways in which theatre can open up and imagine global environment policy-making, particularly as enacted in UN Framework Convention on Climate Change Conventions of the Parties (UNFCCC COPs, particularly with COP26 coming to Glasgow in November.

Perhaps the most consequential theatrical forums of the moment are the UN climate conferences, or COP meetings, which occur every year in a different city and at which the governments of the world negotiate coordinated attempts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Or at least they perform diplomatic negotiation and perform commitments to reduce emissions. Global emissions continue to rise as climate impacts worsen, heightening the fictive, performative impression given by these conferences. At times they appear to be nothing but deceitful political theatre.

Continue reading…

Chris Fremantle, Anne Douglas and Dave Pritchard have been working with global environment policy in a chapter and a timeline to be published in the forthcoming Routledge Companion to Art and the Public Realm. Addressing the works of Helen Mayer Harrison (1927-2018) and Newton Harrison (b. 1932) in parallel with the step-change in global environment policy-making in the early 1970s the new texts explore different understandings of time.

 

Newton Harrison: 3 recent videos including ‘Apologia Mediterranean’

March 13, 2020

Three recent video works by Newton Harrison – an apology to the Mediterranean Sea, a call to Scotland to become the first industrialised country to give back more than it takes out, and an installation to assist biodiversity to adapt in Northern California.

Meditation on the Mediterranean. Included in the Collateral events of the 58th Venice Biennale, as part of Artists Need to Create on the Same Scale that Society Has the Capacity to Destroy: Mare Nostrum at the Complesso della Chiesa di Santa Maria delle Penitenti, Fondamenta di Cannaregio, 910, from 8 May – 24 November 2019.

On The Deep Wealth of this Nation, Scotland included in the Taipei Biennial 2018-19 and exhibited in Banchory, Braemar and Edinburgh. Created with the support of The Barn, Banchory and the SEFARI Gateway.

Future Garden for the Central Coast of California is a site-specific environmental art installation by UCSC emeritus arts research professors Newton Harrison and his late wife Helen Mayer Harrison–at the UC Santa Cruz Arboretum and Botanic Garden.

Working in tandem with botanists at the Arboretum, the Harrisons have created trial gardens inside three refabricated geodesic domes, where native plant species are being exposed to the temperatures and water conditions that have been projected for the region in the near future.

For more on current work see The Center for the Study of the Force Majeure. For historical work see The Harrison Studio. For perspectives on the practice of the Harrisons see various Fremantle and Douglas papers.

How can Scotland adapt to the #climatecrisis? Exhibition and Talk

March 9, 2019
Newton Harrison, 2018, On The Deep Wealth of this Nation, Scotland (detail)

EXHIBITION (TALK below):
NEWTON HARRISON: ON THE DEEP WEALTH OF THIS NATION, SCOTLAND
Tuesday 12 March – Thursday 28 March @ 12pm – 4pm
Free entry – Closed Sundays and Monday

Join us at the Barn during Climate Week North East 2019 this March where we are delighted to welcome back the exhibition by Newton Harrison, On The Deep Wealth Of This Nation, Scotland.

The exhibition comprises a series of maps that develop a climate change vision for Scotland based on the principles of the commons we share in the form of air, soil, forestry and water.  Harrison also proposes a fifth ‘commons of mind’ reflecting the challenge of arriving at commonly agreed action to address the implications of climate change.

On The Deep Wealth of this Nation, Scotland has toured:

9 March 2018, The Barn, First Six Maps exhibited with discussion

14 March 2018, Edinburgh Centre for Carbon Innovation, Natural Flood Management Conference (SEPA/Environment Agency/ CIWEM)

12-25 September, 2018 The Barn, Full Exhibition.
14 September, The Barn, Discussion with Newton Harrison and a traditional Scottish Ceilidh

17 – 28 September 2018, Andrew Grant Gallery, ECA, Edinburgh
20 September: Presentation and discussion with Newton Harrison, Edinburgh College of Art

3 October 2018, Our Dynamic Earth, Exhibition for 41st T. B. Macauley Lecture

17 November 2018-10 March 2019, Taipei Biennial,
Post-Nature – A Museum as an Ecosystem

15 December 2018-12 January 2019, St Margarets, Braemar

For more information: Simone Steward programming@thebarnarts.co.uk

Newton Harrison, 2018, On The Deep Wealth of this Nation, Scotland
(installed Taipei Biennial)

TALK:
CONNECTIONS AND CONVERSATIONS –
THE WORK OF NEWTON HARRISON AND JOHN NEWLING
Thursday 21 March 6.30pm @ The Barn, Banchory

Join Professor Emeritus Anne Douglas and Chris Fremantle, founder of ecoartscotland, leading academics and thinkers in the field of arts and ecology, and other guests to discuss pertinent issues around declining biodiversity and climate change and to consider how artists and others respond to our ever-changing world.The event will be anchored around the work of two internationally renowned figures of arts and ecology; California-based artist Newton Harrison and British artist John Newling.

This will be a very special event where individuals can have an intimate experience with thought-provoking works and explore through discussion, different layers of references and questions that stimulate longer contemplation.

ecoartscotland has recently published a piece on Climate Change Adaptation which references the On The Deep Wealth of this Nation, Scotland.

On The Deep Wealth of this Nation, Scotland, which focuses on Soil, Water, Forestry, Air and the Commons of Mind, can be found here and more on the work with The Barn here.

John Newling’s work with The Barn can be found here

The work has been supported by SEFARI, the network of Scottish Environment, Food and Agriculture Research Institutes, and The Barn is supported by Creative Scotland and Aberdeenshire Council.


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