Archive for the ‘Sited work’ Category

A Field of Wheat: Abby Rose’s Perspective

April 6, 2017

img_8966

Following on the previous post about A Field of Wheat we are pleased to highlight Abby Rose’s recent reflection on the project posted to Agricology.

At a local harvest festival, we bagged up the 100kg of flour we had managed to get milled for our own use, and we had every single thing that was added on farm written in the ingredients list on the pack – fungicides, pesticides, fertilizers and all. The visitors and guests who came along were shocked, and so was I really. This was a powerful way to experience directly the realities of producing food, I had shared the risks with the farmer and I had made some decisions that really surprised me. What’s more, Peter saw that he only needed to apply 1/5th the amount of nitrogen and could still get a high quality crop.

Read the rest of the blog here.

CIWEM Award for LAGI Glasgow Project

October 31, 2016

lagi-glasgow

ecoartscotland is thrilled that the Land Art Generator Glasgow project has been awarded the 2016 Chartered Institution of Water and Environment Management (CIWEM) Arts, Water and Environment Award.

This award acknowledges the major commitment of all the partners, including Glasgow City Council, Scottish Canals and igloo Regeneration whose effective collaboration has made the project possible. And it celebrates the innovative work of the multidisciplinary design teams who participated, including the winning team (Dalziel + Scullion, Qmulus Ltd., Yeadon Space Agency, and ZM Architecture).

The combination of a Council committed to strategic planning and innovation with a land owner and a developer both committed to sustainability at the heart of regeneration has been crucial for the development of LAGI Glasgow.

CIWEM’s Arts and the Environment Network citation highlights the collaboration on the LAGI Glasgow project. The citation says,

The judging panel were particularly impressed by the practical orientation and ambitious scope of the initiative, which directly engages with management of the environment. They praised the multi-disciplinary structure of the collaboration, bringing together science, art, design and engineering expertise to tackle the transition to renewable energy in response to climate change, one of our biggest global environmental challenges. The open sharing of ideas and experience which is facilitated by the project will undoubtedly lead to an ultimate impact beyond the scope of the project alone.

The Nick Reeves AWEinspiring Award is presented annually by CIWEM’s Arts and the Environment Network in association with the Centre for Contemporary Art and the Natural World (CCANW). The award celebrates projects or practitioners who have contributed innovatively to CIWEM’s vision of “putting creativity at the heart of environmental policy and action”.

Dave Pritchard, Chair of CIWEM’s Arts and Environment Network, said: “The quality of nominations for this year’s Award was wonderful. LAGI and ecoartscotland’s work is a superb example of our belief that arts-based approaches offer massive potential for more intelligent ways of responding to environmental challenges”.

Clive Adams, Director of CCANW, said: “Such new forms of collaboration across disciplines are increasingly needed if we are to reach a more harmonious relationship with the rest of nature”.

CIWEM’s Press Release is here.

Julia Barton: Collecting new rock samples in Scotland’s GeoParks

July 5, 2016

Julia Barton sent us the following information on her current work:

plastic rock reveal. NH 093 988 Isle Martin. J Barton

plastic rock reveal. NH 093 988 Isle Martin. J Barton

Artist Julia Barton is presently collecting classifying samples of a new rock now found on beaches in the remotest places on the North West Coast and Shetland, the rocks have become the focus of her Littoral Art Project which is investigating beach litter around Scotland.
Littoral meaning, the zone between the low and the high tide marks.

In 2013 a Canadian geological team named this rock ‘Plastiglomerate’ a category now acknowledged by scientists as a geological marker of our time (the Anthropocene) .  These ‘rocks’ lumps of melted plastic are now common on some beaches, as people turn to burning the increasing volumes of plastic waste which accumulates on beaches.  Every year 8 million tonnes of plastic reaches the world’s ocean and 100,000 sharks, turtles, dolphins and whales die from eating plastic according to the Marine Conservation Society.

The ‘plastic rocks’ are difficult to distinguish from natural beach rocks, and often go un-noticed, each has a unique molecular composition, their toxicity and timeline is unknown.  The ‘rocks’ collected will be used to construct the principal piece of an exhibition opening at Da Gadderie, Shetland Museum – 8th Oct-12 Nov and at An Talla Solais Caledonian Gallery in 2017 (dates to be confirmed).

It is intended that the exhibition will then travel to Edinburgh and internationally. Julia is presently producing a ‘Guide to Beach Litter’ to accompany the exhibition. This exhibition has received part funding from the National Lottery through Creative Scotland Open Project Funding.

Littoral Art Project was set up in 2013 by artist Julia Barton in response to her fear of drowning in litter which she experienced whilst walking on a beach on the North West coast of Scotland. Since then Julia has surveyed and mapped litter on over 20 Scottish beaches engaging local communities in her interactive investigations some of which can be viewed

The aim of the project and exhibition is to encourage understanding of the threat that beach and marine litter presents and to promote change by allowing people to see litter in different ways and consider the long term environmental implications.

LAGI Glasgow at The Lighthouse 9 June-29 July

May 29, 2016

image
Scotland on Sunday features the Land Art Generator Glasgow exhibition, opening at The Lighthouse, Glasgow on 9 June.
Name checks for Wind Forest – ZM Architecture, Dalziel + Scullion, Ian Nicol of Qmulus and Peter Yeadon of Yeadon Space Agency, previous LAGI participant who joined the Scottish team; Watergaw – ERZ Landscape Architecture, Alec Finlay and their overseas team member Riccardo Mariano; Dundas Dandelion – Stallan-Brand Architects, Pigdin Perfect, the Glasgow Science Festival and their overseas partner Matt Rosenberg.
All three proposals imagine renewables at the heart of making Dundas Hill into a new place to live and work. Wind Forest conceptualised this as 10 habits to create a habitat.
REMINDER: Workshop with Creative Carbon Scotland on 8 June. Booking here
Previous story in The Scotsman here.

Reviewer Needed: Exchange by Chris Drury and Kay Syrad

April 29, 2016

We’re looking for someone to review Exchange by Chris Drury and Kay Syrad.
From Chris Drury’s website, “Exchange was produced in collaboration with Kay Syrad and was commissioned by Cape Farewell to look at sustainable ways of living and farming in relation to three farms in Sydling St Nicholas and Godmanston, West Dorset. The two farms in Sydling St Nicholas were Huish sheep farm and Dollens organic dairy farm. The other organic dairy farm was Manor Farm which is the other side of the downland watershed in Godmanston.”
Contact chris @ fremantle . org. Let us know what relevant expertise and experience you have. We are interested in this project both because of the collaboration between a visual artist and a poet and because of its duration and locality.

Opportunity for Project Artist – Hawick Flood Protection Scheme

April 2, 2016

image

Excellent opportunity for an artist to be part of a team working on flood protection – looks like a chance to shape thinking. Comes from CABN in the Borders.

May 2016 – October 2016
Deadline for applications:  Monday 25th April 2016
Fee:  £4000

A unique opportunity has arisen for a Project Artist to work closely with the engineering and project team around the Hawick Flood Protection Scheme (HFPS) and engage communities in the development and design of proposals which can be taken forward within the scheme.   The key priority of the HFPS works is to protect the town from the effects of a ‘1 in 75’ year flood event on the River Teviot, but the works also offer opportunities to incorporate imaginative place-making proposals, including for permanent public artworks, which can be taken forward into the second phase of the HFPS.
This opportunity has been enabled through a partnership between Scottish Borders Council, CH2M (scheme engineers) and the Creative Arts Business Network (CABN), and has already involved initial engagement with community groups around potential proposals. 

More information is available on the CABN website – http://www.cabn.info/opportunities/project-artist-hawick-flood-protection-scheme.html


%d bloggers like this: