Archive for the ‘Sited work’ Category

CIWEM Award for LAGI Glasgow Project

October 31, 2016

lagi-glasgow

ecoartscotland is thrilled that the Land Art Generator Glasgow project has been awarded the 2016 Chartered Institution of Water and Environment Management (CIWEM) Arts, Water and Environment Award.

This award acknowledges the major commitment of all the partners, including Glasgow City Council, Scottish Canals and igloo Regeneration whose effective collaboration has made the project possible. And it celebrates the innovative work of the multidisciplinary design teams who participated, including the winning team (Dalziel + Scullion, Qmulus Ltd., Yeadon Space Agency, and ZM Architecture).

The combination of a Council committed to strategic planning and innovation with a land owner and a developer both committed to sustainability at the heart of regeneration has been crucial for the development of LAGI Glasgow.

CIWEM’s Arts and the Environment Network citation highlights the collaboration on the LAGI Glasgow project. The citation says,

The judging panel were particularly impressed by the practical orientation and ambitious scope of the initiative, which directly engages with management of the environment. They praised the multi-disciplinary structure of the collaboration, bringing together science, art, design and engineering expertise to tackle the transition to renewable energy in response to climate change, one of our biggest global environmental challenges. The open sharing of ideas and experience which is facilitated by the project will undoubtedly lead to an ultimate impact beyond the scope of the project alone.

The Nick Reeves AWEinspiring Award is presented annually by CIWEM’s Arts and the Environment Network in association with the Centre for Contemporary Art and the Natural World (CCANW). The award celebrates projects or practitioners who have contributed innovatively to CIWEM’s vision of “putting creativity at the heart of environmental policy and action”.

Dave Pritchard, Chair of CIWEM’s Arts and Environment Network, said: “The quality of nominations for this year’s Award was wonderful. LAGI and ecoartscotland’s work is a superb example of our belief that arts-based approaches offer massive potential for more intelligent ways of responding to environmental challenges”.

Clive Adams, Director of CCANW, said: “Such new forms of collaboration across disciplines are increasingly needed if we are to reach a more harmonious relationship with the rest of nature”.

CIWEM’s Press Release is here.

Julia Barton: Collecting new rock samples in Scotland’s GeoParks

July 5, 2016

Julia Barton sent us the following information on her current work:

plastic rock reveal. NH 093 988 Isle Martin. J Barton

plastic rock reveal. NH 093 988 Isle Martin. J Barton

Artist Julia Barton is presently collecting classifying samples of a new rock now found on beaches in the remotest places on the North West Coast and Shetland, the rocks have become the focus of her Littoral Art Project which is investigating beach litter around Scotland.
Littoral meaning, the zone between the low and the high tide marks.

In 2013 a Canadian geological team named this rock ‘Plastiglomerate’ a category now acknowledged by scientists as a geological marker of our time (the Anthropocene) .  These ‘rocks’ lumps of melted plastic are now common on some beaches, as people turn to burning the increasing volumes of plastic waste which accumulates on beaches.  Every year 8 million tonnes of plastic reaches the world’s ocean and 100,000 sharks, turtles, dolphins and whales die from eating plastic according to the Marine Conservation Society.

The ‘plastic rocks’ are difficult to distinguish from natural beach rocks, and often go un-noticed, each has a unique molecular composition, their toxicity and timeline is unknown.  The ‘rocks’ collected will be used to construct the principal piece of an exhibition opening at Da Gadderie, Shetland Museum – 8th Oct-12 Nov and at An Talla Solais Caledonian Gallery in 2017 (dates to be confirmed).

It is intended that the exhibition will then travel to Edinburgh and internationally. Julia is presently producing a ‘Guide to Beach Litter’ to accompany the exhibition. This exhibition has received part funding from the National Lottery through Creative Scotland Open Project Funding.

Littoral Art Project was set up in 2013 by artist Julia Barton in response to her fear of drowning in litter which she experienced whilst walking on a beach on the North West coast of Scotland. Since then Julia has surveyed and mapped litter on over 20 Scottish beaches engaging local communities in her interactive investigations some of which can be viewed

The aim of the project and exhibition is to encourage understanding of the threat that beach and marine litter presents and to promote change by allowing people to see litter in different ways and consider the long term environmental implications.

LAGI Glasgow at The Lighthouse 9 June-29 July

May 29, 2016

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Scotland on Sunday features the Land Art Generator Glasgow exhibition, opening at The Lighthouse, Glasgow on 9 June.
Name checks for Wind Forest – ZM Architecture, Dalziel + Scullion, Ian Nicol of Qmulus and Peter Yeadon of Yeadon Space Agency, previous LAGI participant who joined the Scottish team; Watergaw – ERZ Landscape Architecture, Alec Finlay and their overseas team member Riccardo Mariano; Dundas Dandelion – Stallan-Brand Architects, Pigdin Perfect, the Glasgow Science Festival and their overseas partner Matt Rosenberg.
All three proposals imagine renewables at the heart of making Dundas Hill into a new place to live and work. Wind Forest conceptualised this as 10 habits to create a habitat.
REMINDER: Workshop with Creative Carbon Scotland on 8 June. Booking here
Previous story in The Scotsman here.

Reviewer Needed: Exchange by Chris Drury and Kay Syrad

April 29, 2016

We’re looking for someone to review Exchange by Chris Drury and Kay Syrad.
From Chris Drury’s website, “Exchange was produced in collaboration with Kay Syrad and was commissioned by Cape Farewell to look at sustainable ways of living and farming in relation to three farms in Sydling St Nicholas and Godmanston, West Dorset. The two farms in Sydling St Nicholas were Huish sheep farm and Dollens organic dairy farm. The other organic dairy farm was Manor Farm which is the other side of the downland watershed in Godmanston.”
Contact chris @ fremantle . org. Let us know what relevant expertise and experience you have. We are interested in this project both because of the collaboration between a visual artist and a poet and because of its duration and locality.

Opportunity for Project Artist – Hawick Flood Protection Scheme

April 2, 2016

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Excellent opportunity for an artist to be part of a team working on flood protection – looks like a chance to shape thinking. Comes from CABN in the Borders.

May 2016 – October 2016
Deadline for applications:  Monday 25th April 2016
Fee:  £4000

A unique opportunity has arisen for a Project Artist to work closely with the engineering and project team around the Hawick Flood Protection Scheme (HFPS) and engage communities in the development and design of proposals which can be taken forward within the scheme.   The key priority of the HFPS works is to protect the town from the effects of a ‘1 in 75’ year flood event on the River Teviot, but the works also offer opportunities to incorporate imaginative place-making proposals, including for permanent public artworks, which can be taken forward into the second phase of the HFPS.
This opportunity has been enabled through a partnership between Scottish Borders Council, CH2M (scheme engineers) and the Creative Arts Business Network (CABN), and has already involved initial engagement with community groups around potential proposals. 

More information is available on the CABN website – http://www.cabn.info/opportunities/project-artist-hawick-flood-protection-scheme.html

Can visual art affect viewer perceptions of climate change? | Artist Commission

February 19, 2016

Climart, a transnational interdisciplinary research project combining psychology, natural sciences and art has announced an unique commission opportunity for an artist to make a new work communicating climate change… the fees and timescale are ambitious – the only thing is that the result of this is one piece of visual art intended to affect viewers perceptions of climate change, and we need lots of different ones.  Deadline for Expressions of Interest 14 March 2016

More information: Can visual art affect viewer perceptions of climate change? | Artist Commission

Away with the birds

December 6, 2015
Hannah Tuulikki, Away with the Birds, 2014, Film still, Daniel Warren

Hannah Tuulikki, Away with the Birds, 2014, Film still, Daniel Warren

Last summer several years’ worth of development culminated in the performances of Away with the birds, written and performed by Hanna Tuulikki and produced by Suzy Glass.

Hanna Tuulikki’s Air falbh leis na h-eòin is a body of work exploring the mimesis of birds in Gaelic song.

Hanna’s vocal composition, Guth an Eòin | Voice of the Bird is the heart of the project. Written for a female vocal ensemble, it reinterprets archival material, fragmenting and re-weaving extracts of Gaelic songs into an extended soundscape. The music emerges from, and responds to, island landscapes and lives. It explores the delicate equilibrium of Hebridean life, the co-existence of tradition and innovation, and suggests the ever-present inter-relationship between bird, human, and ecology.

‘The piece is made from weaving together fragments of traditional songs and poems that imitate or emulate birdsong’ Tuulikki explains. ‘Each of the five movements represents a different habitat and bird community – wader, sea-bird, wildfowl, corvid, and cuckoo. In August we will perform the concert in the historic harbour of the beautiful Isle of Canna, where the music reverberates with the bird-calls and the ebb of the tide. The setting is so important to the piece. The Small Isles are a magical place and, to me, the performance begins as soon as people climb on-board the ferry-boat to make the crossing: the richness of the experience is people sharing a journey.’

Away with the Birds was conceived for and in relation to the Isle of Canna – its ecology, birdlife, history and community. The last custodians of the island, John Lorne Campbell and Margaret Fay Shaw, were renowned folklorists and ethnomusicologists whose extraordinary collection of Gaelic material is housed in Canna House. Steeped in the Gaelic tradition, their hospitality was famous and their home became a hive of creativity, welcoming artists, musicians, scientists and writers from across the world.

Access the interactive score with access to background material, audio and video clips as well as images here.

In this new version of Air falbh leis na h-eòin you become the navigator, steering your own way through Tuulikki’s score. Within its expansive sweep, sound, music, and movement are translated into gesture and precise notation. Words and vocables – sounds without meaning – represent the shapes of individual birds, flocks, skeins, waves and islands, as well as more abstracted forms, suggestive of motion or topography.

You can explore the entire composition in your own time, taking your own course. You can experience the texture of ecology, survey landscape and seascape, immerse yourself in the film, and read detailed notes on the source songs, poems, and birds. This is a prismatic experience that tunes us into a sonic continuum that reaches into the “more-than-human” world.

Land Art Generator Initiative: Glasgow

December 1, 2015

Excerpts from a recent Land Art Generator Initiative (LAGI) blog,

We believe that there is no better tool for creating a tipping point to strong climate action and 100% renewable energy infrastructure than to present a positive vision to the public of what that could look like and the residual benefits that such policies would bring to cities. The opportunity to bring new energy technologies into city planning and creative placemaking projects is at the heart of LAGI. As a part of the design and implementation of constructed works, LAGI educational programming provides the perfect platform for extensive community engagement and participatory design processes, leading to infrastructures that benefit the greatest number of people. LAGI Glasgow is proving to be the perfect example of this ideal delivery model.

In early 2013, we received an email from Chris Fremantle, producer, researcher, and founder of ecoartscotland. Following on conversations he had as a part of Creative Carbon Scotland’s Green Teas(e) — part of the European Green Arts Lab Alliance project, Chris wanted to know what it would take to bring LAGI to Scotland in 2015. From the start he was interested in customizing the planning of LAGI Glasgow to reflect the complexities of the debate around renewables and their relationship to key environments in Scotland. The success of renewable energy implementation there since the early 2000′s has figured heavily into land use and conservation discussions and has been extremely relevant to the independence debate.

Continue reading here

Elizabeth Monoian and Robert Ferry, LAGI Directors, spoke at the first ArtCOP Scotland event in Edinburgh, hosted by Creative Carbon Scotland.  Read Creative Carbon Scotland’s blog here.

Slowcooker – deep listening

October 28, 2015

Caroline Gausden suggested that SonADA’s slowCooker series of workshops in Aberdeen this winter were closely related to the issues Sam Clark highlighted in her piece on Brett Bloom’s Petro-subjectivity.  The first slowcooker workshop with Kim Cascone took place last weekend in Aberdeen.  There will be five more with different practitioners through to April.  Check out the programme here or have a look at the pdf slowCooker_Series_Programme WEB

The theme of this year’s slowCooker series is slowness and boredom. These two ideas create an interesting contrast to quickness and immediacy which technology and urban life seem to engender, and excitement and fascination which are deemed to be key elements of the process and outcome of many arts practices and performance. The invited artist will design the workshop to help the participants question and challenge a range of relationships between arts, music, technology, creative process, city life, urban environment, internal and rhythms of individuals and the collective mind. Rather than being a separate and disjointed event, each workshop is designed to create a momentum of creative activities among the participants and all six slowCooker series will culminate in sonADA 2016, sonADA’s annual sonic arts festival in Aberdeen.

slowCooker series are monthly workshops organised by sonADA. Considering a creative process not as a quick path to an outcome but as an enduring period where sometimes improbable ideas are imagined and nurtured, each slowCooker series aims to identify seeds of possibility and create an environment where participants take time to grow and mutate these seeds.

Offering six workshops from October 2015 to April 2016 (except in December), sonADA invite eight artists whose expertise is in sonic arts, creative coding, experimental video and film, and performance. Followed by one full-day training session, the artist(s) and participants will produce a performance, exhibition, or happening as an outcome of the workshop in the next day, which is free and open to public.

A Newfoundland Treasury of Terms for Ice and Snow

October 27, 2015
Ballicattered and Devil's Blanket, Blast Hole Pond River, Newfoundland, Winter 2012-2013

Ballicattered and Devil’s Blanket, Blast Hole Pond River, Newfoundland, Winter 2012-2013

A Newfoundland Treasury of Terms for Ice and Snow:
an exhibition by Canadian artist Marlene Creates

November 5-13, 2015
opening reception Thursday Nov 5, 5-7pm

Tent Gallery
Art, Space + Nature Studio
Edinburgh College of Art, Evolution House, ground floor, 78 West Port, Edinburgh EH1 2LE

Sish and Way Ice, Conception Bay, Newfoundland, March 2014

Sish and Way Ice, Conception Bay, Newfoundland, March 2014

In two videos, seasonal phenomena are observed and recorded by means of over 80 named varieties of ice, snow, and winter weather in the Newfoundland dialect. These terms are precise, practical, evocative, sonic, and lyrical. Knowing them helps us actually see different phenomena, instead of winter being just a cold, white blur.

Some examples are: ballicattered (covered with a layer of ice from the action of spray or waves), devil’s blanket (a snowfall that hinders your usual work), sish (fine, granulated ice floating on the surface of the sea), and way ice (loose ice that is easy to navigate).

One of the videos is a 26-minute-long documentary video-poem based on the Blast Hole Pond River that flows through the patch of boreal forest where the artist lives in Newfoundland; the other video is a real-time, single take of sea ice in Conception Bay shot from the Bell Island ferry in March 2014 when it was so cold that the bay itself froze for the first time in decades. It’s not uncommon for Arctic ice or drift-ice (floating masses or fragments of ice driven by wind and current) to float into the bay, but this was local ice, or bay ice.

The word “treasury” usually describes a collection of highly valued poems; it is used in the exhibition’s title to describe a collection of highly valued poetic terms. There is a wide local vocabulary to distinguish specific phenomena in the continuous modulations of winter weather. But this vocabulary is now a fragile intangible artifact. The loss of local linguistic complexity is a result of major changes in Newfoundland & Labrador, particularly the decline of the fishery as an occupation. And these terms are fragile for another reason—climate change.

The exhibition will include the video-poem From the Ground Tier to a Sparrow Batch: A Newfoundland Treasury of Terms for Ice and Snow, Blast Hole Pond River, Winter 2012-2013. It has been screened in Austria, Canada, India, the UK, and the USA, and has won several awards, including the Grand Jury Award at the 2014 Yosemite International Film Festival.

Film Awards

Film Awards

Marlene Creates’s theoretical and studio research interests include photography, ecology, and poetry. Underlying all her work, spanning over 35 years, is an interest in place — not as a geographical location but as a process that involves memory, multiple narratives, ecology, language, and both scientific and vernacular knowledge. Since 2002 her principal artistic venture has been to closely observe and work with one particular place — the six acres of boreal forest that she inhabits in Newfoundland, Canada.

Since the 1970s her work has been presented in over 300 exhibitions across Canada and in Ireland, Scotland, England, France, Denmark, the USA, and China. Her work is in numerous public collections, including the National Gallery of Canada. She has been a guest lecturer at over 150 institutions and conferences, both in Canada and abroad. She is currently an invited academic visitor for the “Art, Space + Nature” Masters programme at the Edinburgh College of Art.
www.marlenecreates.ca

With the assistance of The Canada Council for the Arts and ArtsNL.


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